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Sopwith Camel WWI Ace Admiral David Ingalls

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Sopwith Camel. By: John Ficklen, Signed by: Admiral David Ingalls

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World War I in the air is today remembered through tales of the exploits of such legends as Manfred von Richthofen, the "Red Baron," Frank Luke, the "Arizona Balloon Buster," or "Captain Eddie" Rickenbacker.

Naval aviators also fought on the western front and one would become the first US Navy Ace.

David Sinton Ingalls, DSC and DFC (28 January 1899, Cleveland, Ohio - 26 April 1985, Chagrin Falls, Ohio) was the US Navy's only flying ace of World War I, with six credited victories;thus he was the first ace in U. S. Navy history.He was the son of Albert S. Ingalls; his mother, Jane Taft, was the niece of President William Howard Taft. He was the grandson of railroad executive Melville E. Ingalls.He was the great-grandson of industrialist David Sinton, for whom he was named. He was married to Louise Hale Harkness, daughter of William L. Harkness and granddaughter of Standard Oil founder Stephen V. Harkness.

Lt. David S. Ingalls, an aristocratic young man, who as a member of the Yale Flying Club, joined the Navy and went to fight over the Pas de Calais and Flanders. He flew a legendary airplane -- the Sopwith Camel F-1 and was the only USN ace in World War I. After the war, Ingalls was a leader in the development of both civilian and military aviation becoming Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Aeronautics and rising to the rank of admiral.

The Sopwith Camel was a British First World War single-seat biplane fighter introduced on the Western Front in 1917. Manufactured by Sopwith Aviation Company, it had a short-coupled fuselage, heavy, powerful rotary engine, and concentrated fire from twin synchronized machine guns. Though difficult to handle, to an experienced pilot it provided unmatched manoeuvrability. A superlative fighter, the Camel was credited with shooting down 1,294 enemy aircraft, more than any other Allied fighter of the war. It also served as a ground-attack aircraft, especially near the end of the conflict, when it was outclassed in the air-to-air role by newer fighters.

EDITION: 950 signed/numbered by John Ficklen and David S. Ingalls

SIZE: 18" x 24"

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Sopwith Camel WWI Ace Admiral David Ingalls

Sopwith Camel WWI Ace Admiral David Ingalls

Sopwith Camel. By: John Ficklen, Signed by: Admiral David Ingalls

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